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  • Cheese

    Cheese is the solid part of milk, also known as curd, obtained by separating it from the liquid part (known as whey) by a chemical reaction. Curds are separated from the whey by adding an acid, bacteria culture and/or starter (rennet). Cheese can be described according to its texture as hard, semi-hard or soft or it can be described according to extent of maturing as fresh or ripened.



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  • Fresian Characteristics

    Body colour is black and white Body size is large Milk production is high Feed requirements is very high Meat production is high The cow’s milk has low butter/fat content Average Live-Weight is 600kg She is very sensitive to management Friesians are important for both dairy and beef production (i.e. they are dual purpose)



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  • Ayrshire Characteristics

    Body colour is Dark brown with white patches Milk production is high Feed requirements is high Meat production is fair Her milk has relatively low butter fat content Average Live Weight is 450kg Her major importance is dairy



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  • Market for Bee products

    There is currently a very high demand for honey both in Kenya and overseas. Kenya is now licensed to export honey to the European Union. Market opportunity exists for beekeepers but lack of production is at present the main constraint in Kenyan beekeeping. Good quality honey can fetch a high price. Any farmer who has the good fortune and skill to obtain honey should have no trouble selling it. In general, if you present honey to the consumer in a clean, unspoiled condition, the price will be higher. Beekeepers should aim for the highest grade of honey to maximise returns from beekeeping. Honey in Kenya is sold in the following grades:



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  • Honey harvest
    • Harvest honey during dry spells, i.e., January, February, March, July, August, September, November, and December.



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  • Bee Keeping

    Beeswax is a product of the beehive. For every 100kgs of honeycomb, you can get about eight to 10kgs of beeswax. 
    Honeybees secrete beeswax in the form of thin scales. 12- to 17-day-old worker bees produce them through glands on their ventral (stomach) surface. Honeybees use beeswax to build honeycomb cells in which they raise their young and store honey and pollen.

    To produce wax, bees must consume about eight times as much honey by mass. Estimates are that bees fly 150,000 miles to yield one pound of beeswax or 530,000 km/kg.

    Beeswax is extracted from combs of bees. It is used to make candles, shoe polish and water proofing materials. In a newly installed KTBH (Kenya Top Bar Hive), the wax is applied on top-bars to attract bees to the hive and also acts as comb foundation. Beeswax is also used to encase human drugs to prevent degradation by stomach enzymes. It is also used in the cosmetic industry.



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Dog